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5 Books to Read for Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage Month is the perfect time to read books by Hispanic authors to your elementary students! We share 5 recommended books for Hispanic Heritage Month.

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Hispanic Heritage Month is the perfect time to read books by Hispanic authors to your elementary students! Not only will they learn about different cultures, but they will also be exposed to beautiful stories that are sure to capture their imaginations. In this blog post, we will share 5 recommended books for you to read during Hispanic Heritage Month. We will also provide you with book titles, author names, and discussion questions so that you can get the most out of these books!

If you’re looking to do more activities in your classroom to recognize and celebrate heritage months, make sure you check out all of my heritage month resources here!

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros, Paperback | Barnes & Noble®

The first book on our list is “The House on Mango Street” by Sandra Cisneros. This coming-of-age novel tells the story of Esperanza, a young girl growing up in the Latino community on Chicago’s West Side. As Esperanza tells her own story, she also paints a picture of what life is like for many Latino Americans. This is a great book for sparking discussions about identity, community, and what it means to be American.

Some discussion questions you could ask after reading this book include:

  • What did you learn about the Latino community in Chicago from reading this book?
  • What do you think it means to be American?

Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan

Esperanza Rising (Scholastic Gold): Ryan, Pam Muñoz: 9780439120425:  Amazon.com: Books

The second book on our list is “Esperanza Rising” by Pam Munoz Ryan. This historical fiction novel tells the story of Esperanza Ortega, a wealthy girl living in Mexico during the Great Depression. When her father is killed and the family is forced to move to California to work in the fields, Esperanza must learn how to adapt to her new life. This is a great book for sparking discussions about family, culture, and social class.

Some discussion questions you could ask after reading this book include:

  • What did you learn about Mexican culture from reading this book?

The Circuit by Francisco Jimenez

Paperback The Circuit: Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child Book

The third book on our list is “The Circuit” by Francisco Jimenez. This autobiographical novel tells the story of young Francisco, who migrates with his family from Mexico to California to work in the fields. Through hard work and determination, Francisco is eventually able to go to school and become a teacher. This is a great book for sparking discussions about immigration, hard work, and the American Dream.

Some discussion questions you could ask after reading this book include:

  • How did Francisco’s experiences differ from your own?
  • What did you learn about immigration from reading this book?
  • What do you think it means to achieve the American Dream?

Enrique’s Journey by Sonia Nazario

Enrique's Journey: The Story of a Boy's Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite with  His Mother: Sonia Nazario, Sonia Nazario: 9780812971781: Amazon.com: Books

The fourth book on our list is “Enrique’s Journey” by Sonia Nazario. This non-fiction book tells the story of Enrique, a young boy who migrates from Mexico to the United States in search of his mother. Along the way, he faces many challenges, including poverty, violence, and deportation. This is a great book for sparking discussions about immigration, family separation, and social justice.

Some discussion questions you could ask after reading this book include:

  • What did you learn about immigration from reading this book?
  • What do you think should be done to improve the immigration system in the United States?

Dreamers by Yuyi Morales

Paperback Dreamers Book

The fifth book on our list is “Dreamers” by Yuyi Morales. This picture book tells the story of a young boy named Carlos, who comes to the United States from Mexico with his mother. Together, they learn English and start a new life in America. This is a great book for sparking discussions about immigration, language learning, and cultural adjustment.

Some discussion questions you could ask after reading this book include:

  • What did you learn about immigration from reading this book?
  • What do you think is the most important thing for someone who is new to the United States to do?
  • How did Carlos and his mother feel about leaving Mexico and starting a new life in America?

Do you have any other recommendations for books to read to elementary students for Hispanic Heritage Month? Let us know in the comments! And don’t forget to check out our other blog post about celebrating Heritage Months in the classroom.

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